Library Blog

Small Business Saturday

small business owner coffee shop

Saturday, November 28th is Small Business Saturday.

After celebrating Thanksgiving, it is an American tradition to go shopping.  Lots of people like to get started early with their holiday shopping.  A number of stores even open the night of Thanksgiving (to some controversy).  The next day is famously (or perhaps infamously) known as Black Friday.  Black Friday is typically the busiest shopping day of the year.  Its somewhat dark name comes from businesses moving from “the red” into “the black,” that is, the turning point in which a business gains profit.

The day after that is Small Business Saturday.  It’s always scheduled for the last Saturday in November.  This year, Small Business Saturday falls on November 28.  (For those keeping track, Small Business Saturday is two days after Thanksgiving, one day after Black Friday, and two days before Cyber Monday, when everyone returning to work has access to computers for some serious online shopping.)

Small Business Saturday was actually invented by American Express in 2010.  (Inspired, the UK started a Small Business Saturday in 2013).  Small Business Saturday was created as a counterpart to Black Friday and Cyber Monday.  This day is meant to encourage people to shop small and local businesses, those actual brick and mortar buildings people see right in their town.  It was a push to inspire people to patronize their neighborhood businesses, a good way to support small business owners.  This is especially important this year, with the pandemic pushing people into new and unusual territory: which causes people to socially distance, avoid crowded stores, and purchase items online to be delivered to their homes.  And sadly, many businesses are struggling.

Consider shopping locally on Small Business Saturday.  Help your neighbors and local businesses, and stimulate your local economy.  Keep your money (and your taxes!) right here in your neighborhood.

Now, on the flip side, if you are interested in starting your own small business, the library is here to help you!  Before you start your business, you will want to research and do your homework! We have lots of available resources that can be useful, and they are all free to use on our website.  (Some resources may require you to input your library card number first.  If you don’t have one, get one from your closest library branch, or you can sign up virtually for a digital card.)

Additional Resources

Check out our How-To Guides for starting your own business at https://www.libraryvisit.org/research/business-resources/how-to-guides/.

For information on Business in general and/or information on specific businesses, visit our Business Resources page at https://www.libraryvisit.org/business/.

Speaking of working, be sure to check out our Back-to-Work blogs at https://www.libraryvisit.org/blog/category/economic-recovery/.

And finally, take the library shopping with you!  Print off one of these convenient handouts, and keep your mind occupied as you stand in line! Black Friday Shopping List and Handout.

Kelly

Kelly is a librarian at the Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County. As the Adult Programming Specialist, her focus is bringing adults the library programs they love.  (Kids can’t have ALL the fun!).  She reads strictly nonfiction and picture books.  She believes that anything you could ever need or want is located somewhere in the library.  Including friends.