Library Blog

Cooking with the Library: Five Mocktails in Four Minutes

 

Mocktails, also called no-proof cocktails, have a long history of providing refreshing alternatives to alcoholic beverages. Some have gained popularity due to the temperance movements or among communities where alcohol isn’t consumed, but they can also be fun and fancy substitutes for events like baby showers, high school graduations, or professional mixers. You may find them to be more affordable and better for your waistline than conventional cocktails, since most of the ingredients are less expensive and without the same caloric impact as alcohol.
Here are five mocktails you may want to try at home, starting from the simplest and gradually building in both time and expertise.

 

 

 


These first three mocktails utilize grenadine, a sweet and tart syrup that can be made at home or purchased from the store. Contrary to popular belief, grenadine is not cherry-flavored. The word grenadine comes from the French word grenade, which means “pomegranate.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shirley Temple

Ingredients needed:

  • 1 tablespoon Grenadine
  •  8 to 12 oz of ginger ale or lemon lime soda
  •  maraschino cherries

Procedure:

  1.  Pour grenadine into glass, preferably over ice.
  2.  Add soda until glass is full.
  3.  Garnish with a maraschino cherry or two!

Makes one serving

 

Roy Rogers

Ingredients needed:

  •  1 tablespoon Grenadine
  •  8 to 12 oz of cola
  •  maraschino cherries

Procedure:

  1.  Pour grenadine into glass, preferably over ice.
  2.  Add soda until glass is full.
  3.  Garnish with a maraschino cherry or two!

Makes one serving

 

Grenadine Sunset

For this recipe, you can use sugar or simple syrup. Simple syrup can be bought at the store but it’s also easily made at home. Simply combine equal parts sugar and water and heat on the stove until the sugar is dissolved. You can use different types of sugar (i.e. demerara or turbinado) or different proportions of water to sugar if you like. This can be stored in an airtight container for at least a week or two. This is a good way to add sweetness to ice cold beverages without grainy residue left by sugar, which won’t always dissolve completely.

 

Ingredients needed:

  •  3 cups orange juice
  • 4 tablespoons lime juice
  •  4 tablespoons sugar or simple syrup
  •  1 tablespoon of grenadine per serving

Procedure:

  1.  Combine orange juice and lime juice in a pitcher.
  2.  Add sugar or simple syrup and stir until dissolved.
  3.  Add grenadine directly to glasses for serving, over ice if desired.
  4.  Add juice mixture to glasses and serve.

Makes 4-6 servings

 

Ginger Syrup (Ginger Beer)

This ginger syrup packs a potent punch! This ginger syrup makes a ginger “beer” that’s more strongly flavored and spicier than store-bought ginger ale. While ginger beer is traditionally brewed, this recipe skips the fermenting process in order to avoid creating any alcohols. This ginger syrup is also good for adding to a cup of tea or a favorite baking recipe.

I adapted this recipe from America’s Test Kitchen:  How to Cocktail: Recipes and Techniques for Building the Best Drinks

Ingredients needed:

  •  8 oz unpeeled ginger
  •  5 oz water
  •  ¼ cup sugar
  •  1 teaspoon ground ginger
  •  1 tablespoon lemon juice

Procedure for ginger syrup:

  1.  Finely chop unpeeled ginger (I recommend using a food processor if possible).
  2.  Combine sugar and water in a saucepan on the stove; bring to a simmer but do not allow to boil.
  3.  Once the sugar is dissolved, add chopped ginger and ginger powder, stirring gently to combine.
  4.  Return mixture to a simmer and then remove from heat.
  5.  Allow the mixture to cool to room temperature and then cover and refrigerate overnight (at least 12 but up to 24 hours).
  6.  Strain the solids out using a cheesecloth, squeezing every possible drop from the mixture.
  7.  Add lemon juice after straining.

This will make 5 to 6 ounces of ginger syrup.

Procedure for ginger beer:

  1.  Combine 1 cup of seltzer or club soda per ounce of ginger syrup, adding more seltzer depending on desired spiciness.
  2.  Add lime juice to taste, if desired.

Makes 4-6 servings

 

Switchel (Haymaker’s Punch)

Switchel, also known as Haymaker’s Punch, has been served in the Americas since the 1700s. This is a great recipe for really hot days when we spend a lot of time outdoors, because it serves up both electrolytes (potassium provided by oatmeal and maple syrup) and anti-inflammatories (curcumin in the ginger). If this recipe is too tart for you, feel free to dilute with water or add honey or simple syrup as a sweetener.

I adapted this recipe from America’s Test Kitchen: How to Cocktail: Recipes and Techniques for Building the Best Drinks

 

Ingredients needed:

  •  48 oz water
  •  6 oz apple cider vinegar
  •  4 oz maple syrup
  •  ¼ cup rolled oats
  •  2 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  •  1 teaspoon lemon zest
  •  ¼ teaspoon salt

Procedure:

  1.  Combine all ingredients and bring to a simmer in a large pot or saucepan. Do not allow to boil.
  2.  Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.
  3.  Cover and refrigerate at least 6 hours but up to 24 hours.
  4.  Strain out the solids and serve.

Makes 4-6 servings


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We hope you enjoy these tasty and refreshing beverages with your friends and family soon!

 

Bridgid works in Austintown and loves using the makerspace at the Michael Kusalaba branch. Her favorite thing to read is fiction, but she can be tempted into reading almost anything. When she’s not reading or writing, she might be found playing games or failing at arts and crafts.