Genealogy Programs

 


All programs are designed and presented by Tim Seman, Genealogy and Local History Librarian, Information Services Department, Main Library
Contact: tseman@libraryvisit.org, or 330-744-8636
Program duration is approximately 90 minutes.
Registration is required by phoning 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below the description.


Do you want to start your family tree?
Can we help you break through a brick wall?
Or are you merely curious about the hottest hobby in the U.S.?

Come to Main Library for one-on-one assistance, and get answers.

Meet with our genealogy volunteers every Thursday afternoon from 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. in the Genealogy and Local History Center, Information Services Department, second floor.

And don’t forget, you are always welcome to schedule a meeting with the genealogy and local history librarian, Tim Seman, tseman@libraryvisit.org


Upcoming Genealogy and Local History Programs


Thank you for attending! 


2019 Programs May – August


Using MyHeritage For Your Heritage

A recent arrival to our list of research tools, MyHeritage is one of the largest, most internationally diverse genealogy databases of its kind in the world. It includes billions of historical documents from more than 48 countries, millions of historical photos, public records, indexes and additional resources. Join Tim Seman as he demonstrates this important research tool. For adults and teens. Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Canfield Library Meeting Room, 6:30 P.M., Thursday, May 9


“I’m In The Book”: Using City Directories To Locate People In Place And Time

City directories are often overlooked, but these texts prove quite useful to family historians. Ancestors are listed regardless of whether they owned a telephone. Wives, widows and other family members are listed. Streets and maps are shown, along with the names of neighbors. Churches, cemeteries, business, advertisements and historical information are presented over the span of many years. It is an ideal resource for investigating intervals between US Census years. For adults and teens. Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Austintown Library Meeting Room, 6:30 P.M., Thursday, May 23


Bearing Witness to Life: Oral History and the Conveyance of Experience

Oral history is a first-person narrative that preserves a portrait of experiences and interpretations of events. Oral accounts provide eyewitness “testimony,” offering a richer description of the past, to teach us what has changed and what has stayed the same. Historical documents alone do not provide a full spectrum of knowledge. Oral history reports offer answers to questions that were left out of those documents. Oral history is the place to discover personal stories and truths that have been untold or forgotten. For the genealogist who has lost or never possessed the war letters and diaries of their ancestors, some level of context and understanding can be gained from the experiences of those who were there, and lived to tell their stories. In this program we will examine oral history resources and discuss the best practices for conducting effective interviews. For adults and teens. Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Boardman Library Meeting Room, 6:30 P.M., Thursday, May 30

 

75th Anniversary of D-Day

Courage.  Sacrifice.  These two words begin and end any discussion of the pivotal landing operations at Normandy, France that commenced 6 June 1944.  As we commemorate this event, join Tim Seman as he shares the profiles of some Mahoning Valley men who were there.  This presentation is an opportune time to learn about the military research databases and other resources that can further your genealogical projects.  For adults and teens.  Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Boardman Library Meeting Room, 6:30 P.M., Tuesday, June 4

 

DNA Tests and Genealogy

Can DNA testing help you determine your ancestry?  Discovering the level of genetic relationship you have with other individuals and cultures can be enlightening.  We will examine this process, acknowledging the benefits and drawbacks.  Several excellent online resources will be shared.  For adults and teens.  Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Poland Library Meeting Room, 6:30 P.M., Thursday, June 27

 

Using Newspapers for Genealogical Research

Newspapers are essential for acquiring obituaries, stories, local history, and other information.  We will survey all of the available resources, with special emphasis on digitized collections.  For adults and teens.  Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Main Library Meeting Room, 6:30 P.M., Thursday, July 11

 

The Power of Ancestry.com

This program is a demonstration of the Ancestry database.  As an online tool, it is essential for beginning and advancing your research.  Come and learn how to use this fantastic resource.  For adults and teens.  Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Canfield Library Meeting Room, 6:30 P.M., Thursday, July 18

 

Leave No Soldier Behind: Finding Our Family Members In Uniform

Explore the records of our armed forces.  Learn how to pursue personnel files, unit histories, and pension records in order to understand your ancestor’s role in defending our nation’s heritage.  For adults and teens.  Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Poland Library Meeting Room, 6:30 P.M., Thursday, July 25

 

Will Cemeteries Die? The Future of Burial Rites

Are cemeteries a permanent part of the landscape in family history research?  During the 21st century it is likely that dwindling land space, environmental concerns, the surge in non-burial options, and the availability of new technologies all will lead to significant changes in death rituals.  We will examine what this means for genealogy.  Online cemetery databases will be identified and demonstrated.  Significant print collections containing cemetery inscription indices will be shared.  For adults and teens.  Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Boardman Library Meeting Room, 6:30 p.m., Thursday, August 8

 

Using FamilySearch Database

FamilySearch is an incredible research tool, with records from all U.S. states and many countries around the world.  Use of this resource requires free registration, whereby each researcher sets up their own account.  FamilySearch has a wiki that serves as on online genealogy encyclopedia, offering articles and audiovisual tutorials.  Did you know that this resource provides free death certificates for Ohio deaths occurring 1908-1953?  Tim Seman will demonstrate best practices for using this amazing database, including how to set-up your free account.  For adults and teens.  Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Canfield Library Meeting Room, 6:30 P.M., Tuesday, August 20

 

Go West, Young Men of Steel: W. Pigott, E.W. Wilson, and Youngstown, WA

Despite the many miles of industrial riverfront in the Mahoning Valley, it may have been a bit too crowded for William Pigott and Elliot Wilson.  Pursuing their interests out west, these Valley men founded significant steel and railcar manufacturing facilities in the Seattle area over one hundred years ago.  The Seattle Steel Company forged one particular neighborhood on the banks of the Duwamish River, and would be named after their former home: Youngstown.  By looking at the development of this industrial town, we may see, and be reminded of, some of the raw ingredients that made the Mahoning Valley.  In this program, Tim Seman will profile these men and highlight the interesting similarities and differences between Youngstown, Ohio and Youngstown, Washington.  For adults and teens.  Registration is required by calling the Information Services Department 330-744-8636, online via the library’s events calendar, or directly from the program link below.

Austintown Library Meeting Room, 6:30 P.M., Thursday, August 29